Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

There was once a stage where I’d go out at least once a week with my camera, but the long dark winter nights never did anything for my productivity or enthusiasm and as such, I’ve failed miserably over the last couple of months. Now that the evenings are getting brighter, its time to get back on the horse (read ‘bike’) and get the camera out again…The snaps below were taken over two nights, one recent, the other not so recent.

The Docklands is a great place for a wander with a camera. Its less than five minutes cycle from O’Connell Bridge, but its a world away. I’ll hopefully have another piece up next week from the area around the port itself. Below, I never noticed that you could see Lansdowne Road from the Liffey before. I took this at the time, and then on a bus the other day with Donal from this here parish and he saw it and said “that’s a great snap…” Well, here you are. A bit grey but…

005

Apologies for the quality of the below snap, it was taken from the other side of the Liffey and daylight was starting to fade. For the sheer size of the piece its worth a look, must be at least thirty foot long. Sam has previously published a series of articles on Dublin graffiti artists, and the entry for UEK can be found here.

003 copy

Below is a close-up of the sign you can see in the distance in the first image. A strange little area this, with locks and little bridges over docks off the Liffey. Looks like a great place for undisturbed midsummers drinking all the same…

020

(more…)

Read Full Post »

My apologies to Poxbottle, who asked that any posts referring to Irish graffiti not be called “The writings on the wall…” Its only for this short series, I swear! Anyways, last week I put up some images of the street art behind the Bernard Shaw and said I was going to follow it up, so here it is… The lane behind Whelan’s/ The Village. I’m hoping to get another couple of these posts up in the next week or so, there’s a some more hidden spots around Dublin city where our street artists show off their talents that are worth documenting…

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“The delights a stroll around Dublin can bring you. I’ve always carried my camera around with me, but have only recently started to take it out and not give a shite that I look like a tourist.”

If you like graffiti, and well, taking pictures of graffiti like us, there are some hidden gems around Dublin. The Tivoli Carpark is one that we generally return to, as the annual Jam there always provides… Below is another, the lane behind the Bernard Shaw, Richmond Street. I’ve only put up nine snaps, I could have taken a hell of a lot more but this post would have been very long if I did… I’ll have another photo piece in a couple of days from another spot just around the corner that’s worth checking out. Click “continue reading” to see the full post…

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“The delights a stroll around Dublin can bring you. I’ve always carried my camera around with me, but have only recently started to take it out and not give a shite that I look like a tourist.”

Someone said of the last bunch of photo’s I stuck up that Dublin is starting to look like a proper shithole… Its not- its really not, its just that for whatever reason, I like taking pictures of graffiti, rundown buildings and, well, real Dublin. For any piece of eight or ten images, its possible to have taken fifty or sixty shots on my not very fancy camera. Subsequently, I have hundreds of shots of birds, trees, sunshine and flowers. But I still prefer the grittier side of things!

The Seahorses of Grattan Bridge. JayCarax has done some great work on the history of the Grattan statue on College Green. The  statue is, of course, surrounded by lamps bearing ornate seahorses. Grattan Bridge bears the same idols on its lamps.

I’ve recently moved gaff, so my cycle to work takes me down along the canal, from Rathmines to Inchicore. For three months, I’ve been cycling past this spot and never noticed this piece on the side of the bridge at Herberton Road until this week. The work of Solus, I think its a belter!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“The delights a stroll around Dublin can bring you. I’ve always carried my camera around with me, but have only recently started to take it out and not give a shite that I look like a tourist.”

The last couple of months have been busy, and I haven’t gotten out with the camera as much as I would like. Hence, I’m a little rusty. I hope to remedy this though, and over the next while, hope to get one post of pictures up a fortnight… I’ll start off with the below, looking down toward School Street from Earl Street South- “Fuck the System.”

“Dublin is in palliative care, drowning in oceans of Lynx and fake tan and fake people. Hipsters, bints, where have all the real people…” something, something, angry rant, something.

I hoped to have two scooters in this piece, one far more impressive than the one below, but an unfortunate incident of a disappearing memory card means there’s just this one. Just off Grafton Street, a beauty. The blokier version will appear in the next “A few quick snaps” post.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

There was a time when transport by tram around Dublin wasn’t restricted to two bizarrely unconnected routes, when tramlines extended miles in every direction, spreading from O’Connell Street outwards like arteries from a heart to Dublin’s rapidly expanding suburbs.

Three companies operated the trams initially, the Dublin Tramways Company, the North Dublin Street Tramways Company,  and Dublin Central Tramways. These companies united in 1880, forming the Dublin United Tramways Company, with 137 trams running routes which totaled over 32 miles. The last horse tram ran in January 1901,  by which time Dublin had completely electrified it’s system, now with 66 miles of track, of which nearly 50 were owned by the DUTC.

As well as numbers, the trams also had colourful route indicators. Uploaded by JadedIsle

The first tram came into service in February 1872, and ran from College Green to Rathgar. The trams generally operated within the City Centre or stretching to the more affluent South Dublin suburbs. Traveling on the trams, in the early days at least, was a luxury only Dublin’s white collar workers could afford. The majority of trams started at, or stopped nearby Nelson’s Pillar, and their terminus’  stretched to the likes of Sandymount, Blackrock, Dun Laoghaire, Dalkey and Terenure, as can be seen on the route identifier above. As well as featuring in a high percentage of photo’s of Dublin streets at the turn of the last century, they played parts in the Easter Rising, being toppled and bombed and their wreckage used for barricades, and feature in Joyce’s Ulysses.

Uploaded by Cracker on dublin.ie

What must have been the 21 tram to Inchicore

For over twenty years after the introduction of electric trams here, Dublin was a pioneer in tram building, the works in Inchicore churning out carriages whose design would be copied worldwide. But the introduction of the car to Irish roads, the growth in their use in the twenties,  and the newly designed four wheeled “bogey,” or basically a precursor to the bus saw the abandonment of many trams. The last tram in Dublin City ran on on 9th July 1949,  with the Howth Head line lasting another ten years before it too succumbed to progress. Some of their lines can still be found around the city, relics of a time past.

Removing the tracks at Lord Edward Street

A copy of the Dublin United Tramways Company from 2010 has been uploaded by the National Archives of Ireland and can be found here. The image of workers removing the tracks from Cork Street is from the Dublin City Council’s Photographic Collection.

Read Full Post »

“The delights a stroll around Dublin can bring you. I’ve always carried my camera around with me, but have only recently started to take it out and not give a shite that I look like a tourist.

Sometimes I even post the resulting photographs up here. Below are the fruits of this weeks labours…

Anyone who can tell me where the above is, I’ll buy you a pint. Below, the Castle Hotel on Great Denmark Street.

Below is a selection of graffiti from Rutland Place, a street in Dublin I’d never been down prior today… Bizaarely enough, you think you know the city inside out and then somewhere new suprises you. Pics read left to right, a good 30 foot of tags.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,161 other followers

%d bloggers like this: