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With Arthur’s Day fast approaching, Come Here To Me looks at the monument to Sir Arthur Edward Guinness, great-grandson of ‘To Arthur!’ himself. A leading unionist politician in the city, Sir Arthur opened St. Stephen’s Green Park to the general public The statue to Sir Arthur Edward Guinness, which gazes over in the direction of […]

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We’ve a long running series on Come Here To Me looking at the statues of Dublin, ranging from the controversial (Sean Russell comes to mind) to the removed (Victoria for example), and even looking at unusual moments like the bombing of the Daniel O’Connell statue by loyalists in 1969. One fascinating series of statues in […]

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Writing from the Phoenix Park on August 6th 1849, in a letter addressed to the Belgian King, Queen Victoria noted that “you see more ragged and wretched people here than I ever saw anywhere else.” Victoria’s visit occurred at a time Ireland was still in great anguish following the famine, and Victoria has rather unforgettably […]

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The People’s Garden in the Phoenix Park is home to a magnificent statue of Sean Heuston, one of the sixteen men executed for their role in leading the 1916 uprising. Only a short walk from Heuston, one comes to the the remnants of a memorial to the old order in the form of the plinth […]

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Statues have long been divisive in Dublin of course, and the statues of figures associated with the British Empire have long been targeted by Irish republicans. As we’ve featured on Come Here To Me before, statues of Irish nationalists in Dublin have on occasion been targeted by Loyalists too. Truly remarkable however is the statue […]

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A magnificent statue at St Michan’s Park opposite the Little Green Street Gallery caught my eye recently. The statue stands within a park which was once the location of Newgate Prison, which the statue tells us was “associated in dark and evil days with the doing to death of confessors of Irish liberty, who gave […]

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The statues on each side of the Trinity College Dublin Campanile are well known to many, not only to students of the college but also to the many Dubliners who use use the college as a shortcut from Dame Street to Nassau Street. On the left hand side, you find George Salmon. Salmon, as well […]

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Elizabeth McLaughlin’s statue to the Countess Markievicz was slammed in The Irish Times of October 21 2000 by Robert O’Byrne. In a piece looking at five ‘statues to forget’, it was noted that the statue “bears almost no resemblence to the rebel Countess, it is coarsely executed, a giftshop item enlarged”. Ouch. Still, the writer […]

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Leo Broe, himself a member of the Irish Volunteers, is best remembered today for his various monuments to Irish republicans throughout the country. His memorial sculpture opposite Phibsborough Library on the North Circular Road is one of my favourite statues in Dublin, dating back to 1939. The statue serves as a monument to the men […]

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We’ve had a long running series on the site looking at the statues in Dublin city centre, but it got me thinking what Dubliners are remembered with statues abroad? I came up with a few, asked jaycarax who could think of one or two others, and this is the list to start: Arthur Wellesley,The Duke […]

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Scottish historian and left-wing political activist Bob Purdie (1940-2014) published a number of autobiographical passages on his Facebook profile not long before he passed away. Two were focused on Dublin and I thought they would be worth sharing here for a larger audience. The first piece comes from 1970 and Purdie recalls his early opinions […]

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In what one friend has jokingly described as “a victory for secularist alcoholics”, the Luas Cross City project eventually caught up with the statue of Father Theobald Mathew. Sculpted by Mary Redmond, the statue serves to remember the “apostle of temperance”, and it was unveiled before a huge crowd in 1893. One contemporary magazine described […]

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