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Search Results for 'statues of Dublin'

Thirty years ago in 1985, Ireland was gripped by the summer of moving statues. From Ballinspittle in County Cork to suburban Dublin, people gathered at religious monuments in the hope or belief that they would witness statues physically moving before their very eyes. While this story is well-known now, one aspect of the story has […]

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Given the never-ending controversies that came with his O’Connell Street column, many Dubliners may be surprised to hear there is a Nelson Street in the city today, named in honour of Horatio Nelson. Located in Dublin 7 in the north inner-city, I walk by it on an almost daily basis, though Sráid Nelson didn’t catch […]

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  St. Stephen’s Green as we know it has been open to the public since 1880, thanks to the generosity of Lord Ardilaun, or Arthur Guinness, the great-grandson of the founder of the Guinness company with whom he shared a name. It was Ardilaun who financed the landscaping of the park in the late 1870s, […]

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The Tholsel was an important administrative building in Dublin historically, which stood on the junction of Skinner’s Row, Nicholas Street and High Street. It occupied the site where Jury’s Hotel stands today, opposite Christchurch Cathedral. The building was demolished in 1820, with no trace of it remaining at its original location. Essentially, its name meant […]

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Availing of the unusually decent weather lately, I walk into the city most days. The route I take brings me over the Blackquiere Bridge in Phibsboro. The brilliant monument to an Irish Volunteer on the bridge demands the attention of those who pass over it, but the very name of the bridge is so unusual […]

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A visitor to Hawarden in Wales might stumble across a statue in honour of William Ewart Gladstone, the four-time prime minister of Britain. A hugely important figure in nineteenth century Irish political history, Gladstone’s political career spanned over sixty years, with him first taking the office of prime minister in 1868. Gladstone had tried and […]

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Dublin,1867.

The images below form part of a great series of Dublin images taken in 1867 by Frederick H. Mares. Today, they are held by the British Library. They were part of his work ‘Photographs of Dublin’. The below images and their descriptions come from the British Library digital collection. “The Castle of Dublin is divided […]

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I collect old postcards of Dublin, in particular postcards of the monuments and statues of the city. It’s a cheap and cheerful hobby really, and I’ve accumulated a nice enough collection more for the love of it than anything. They go well with some posts on here, such as the ‘Statues of Dublin’ series, and […]

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The city of exploding statues.

The image above is the view from the top of Nelson’s Pillar, and what a view it was. I’ll be on Newstalk today at 3pm, as I was a fortnight ago, to fill in for the history slot normally covered by Tommy Graham of History Ireland on Sean Moncrieff’s radio programme. Last time I was […]

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As ever, we wish every success to the annual Feminist Walking Tour. I had high hopes of attending and supporting the event, but am away in Italy for the weekend (it’s a hard knock life). The event is free, and is followed by food and refreshments in the Pav, at Trinity College. A (tiny!) selection […]

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I recently picked up this great image of the King William of Orange statue on College Green, which is taken from ‘Ireland In Pictures’, released in 1898. We’ve had a series on the site here dealing with the statues of Dublin, which is still in its infancy, and I collect old original photographs, postcards and […]

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A great bit of controversial engagement with the city by Will St. Leger, placing a female torso on the plinth at City Hall to highlight the lack of monuments and memorials to women in the city. We’ve run a long-running series on the statues of Dublin here on Come Here To Me, and I’ve always […]

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