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Posts Tagged ‘Shamrock Rovers’

Excitement has been building up in the CHTM! extended family over the last week; not just amongst the League of Ireland affecionados but amongst a few others who have not yet made the pilgrimage to Dalymount on derby day. A couple of them will be popping their LOI cherry, while some more are returning after long absences; such is the draw of Dublin’s El Classico.
 
The last time I wrote about this particular fixture was during last season’s title run-in, one post praying for a victory and then another celebrating a hard fought win with a sore head. A new season, and everything / nothing has changed, depending on how you look at it. Rovers have arguably the best squad in the League, while Bohs hopes this season rest on the shoulders of youngsters like Flood and Fagan. A big ask for a young squad, but their performances this season have put the smile back on a few faces- they’ve been giving it socks each game, something you expect from a Bohs side, but didn’t always get last season.

Be there

Crowds this season are up, with Sligo and Derry drawing the guts of two and a half thousand a game and Rovers getting their usual “full house.” One thousand tickets have gone to them for this game, and I expect a crammed Jodi Stand for Bohs. With Rovers in the shed, the proximity of both sets of fans is going to make for one hell of a game. While the pull of this game is understandable, hopefully those making their trip to Dalymount for the first time, or for the first time in a while, realise that football in this country isn’t going to survive unless there are heads coming through those gates week in, week out. (A few quid spent in the bar or the club shop wouldn’t go astray either…) What should be a tight, and tense affair may go some way to attracting people back. My heart is already in my mouth, and I truly can’t wait to get up to Dalymount on Friday. Derby day is always special, lets hope this one is no different.

Come on Bohs.

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El Classico. The Eternal Derby. The Old Firm. El Superclassico. In cities across the world, there is always one game that captures the imagination, the wits and emotions of the masses. From Rome to Liverpool, Glasgow to Buenos Aires, football fans wait tentatively for those days of the season where you meet your fiercest rivals; shaking in anticipation, that constantly nervous feeling grips at your every bone. Sometimes its pure fear, that sick feeling in the pit of your stomach- a dull ache that spreads into your chest the closer the time comes, culminating in chest pains and a dry throat on the day itself. Hoarse before the game even starts having spent the last couple of days yammering onto anyone who’ll listen, whether they have an interest or not, about the game in question. Drunk on the occasion, not on the pints you swallow before it, you know you’ve got just a couple of hours before you’re walking home with either your head in the clouds or the gutter.

Clash of the Titans

That feeling is with me now. For tomorrow night, in Dalymount Park, arguably the most important derby in recent memory is taking place. Shamrock Rovers sit at the top of the table, five points clear of Bohemians with four games to go. A win for Bohs tomorrow pegs that back to two points with three games to go. All to play for you might say. And to be honest, its mere luck that has Bohs in this position-where they have bottled it this season, Rovers have also. So for the last four games, it really is a case of who bottles it less, starting with tomorrow night. What used to be a stroll in the park, three points in the bag for Bohs game is now turning into a nightmare, if memory serves, Bohs haven’t beaten Rovers since the 2-0 victory at Dalymount in March last year- and that seems like an awful long time ago now. It should be a tight affair, Rovers losing Bayly and Murphy to red cards in Friday nights shock loss to UCD and Bohs losing Quigley for a stupid headbutt and O’Connor for a silly challenge outside the box during the dour draw with Bray.

We are Bohs!

To be honest, the nerves are at me already, and have been since Saturday morning. This game always sets the pulse racing for me, the amicable respect generally shown between League of Ireland fans goes out the window and it’s all out war for the evening. The Northside versus The Southside; The Clash of the Titans. Its an all ticket affair so if you’re on for it, get yourself to the bar in Dalyer tonight and pick one up; I can’t bloody wait. Never mind your Anfield or Stadio Olympico; theres nowhere I would rather be tomorrow night than Dalymount Park.

Come on Bohs.

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Without a doubt, C.S Andrews penned one of my favourite books.

Dublin Made Me covers two lives. One, the life and memories of a Dublin youth. The other, a life within the revolutionary movement, serving as adjutant to Liam Lynch during the traumatic Irish Civil War. On reading it, I was struck by Andrews account of the day he made his Confirmation, at the Holy Faith in Dominick Street.

Anyway, on the great day, my mind was more preoccupied with football than with religion because my father had promised to take me to a cup match that afternoon between Bohemians and Shelbourne at Dalymount Park and I was afraid that the ceremony would not finish on time.

At the time, as Andrews noted, Shelbourne and Bohemian F.C were the only senior soccer clubs in the city, and he notes that “the people on the south side followed Shelbourne” He went on to write that the supporters and indeed players of the game were “..exclusively of the lower middle and working classes.” Men would travel north to see one of the Dublin sides take on Linfield, Belfast Celtic, Glentoran, Distillery, Cliftonville or Derry Celtic. These were the first ‘Away Days’, the roots of what we still do today.

Football has a habit of popping up in any account of growing up in Dublin. A love of the beautiful game was not only to be found among native Dubliners, but within immigrant communities too. Nick Harris touched on the love of the game in the Jewish community of ‘Little Jerusalem’, as Clanbrassil Street became known. His account of growing up there, Dublin’s Little Jerusalem ,is a Dublin classic. The local lads, he noted, tended to follow Shamrock Rovers. In the book he recounts stories of away trips, noting his brothers would follow the Hoops all over Ireland.

Once in Sligo, when Rovers were playing Sligo they were leading one goal to nil and Sligo were awarded a penalty. As the Sligo man was about to take the kick, Hymie(his older brother) jumped over the fence and kicked the ball away from the spot.

The Jewish youth evem established a team among themselves, naming it New Vernon, a nod to a “Jewish club that played in Dublin some years earlier”. They played frequently in the Phoenix Park, and Harris noted that the team “… played some great matches with various non-Jewish teams, and we were often applauded by people who stopped to watch the game.” Recently when passing through what was once the Jewish area of Dublin, I spotted a child kicking a football against a wall and was reminded of this tale. Harris also remembered a raid on the house next door by Black and Tans in 1921. The family next door were the Clery’s, one of whom was a footballer for Bohs. “From the noise that was going on, it sounded as though they were playing football” he noted. They were, with a football they found in one of the rooms.

(more…)

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An interesting one this, the soccer section of the papers sports section.

Shamrock Rovers and Belfast Celtic, Dundalk and Cork City, Limerick and Shelbourne and a Leinster F.A selection against Motherwell at Dalymount Park feature.

This is a gem from inside the paper. Hitler Says Relax!

Lastly, this ad for Wills’s Gold Flake cigarette’s is a bit bizarre.

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Following on from Only Fools and Horses (Bohs) last week, here’s another League of Ireland fanzine, Hoops Upside Your Head. I’d intended to scan up a loaned copy of No Way, Referee! from Bray Wanderers, but a tip of the hat is due in the direction of the Irish Election Literature Blog, for linking me to the scans of this one. Nice work.

This fanzine comes from the 1994 season. It includes a great piece on away trips to Limerick, a report of a trip to Zabre, a piece on the incompetence of the FAI, and even an offer to send ” SRFC.bmp” to those who send a blank formatted diskette to the fanzine. Ah, the novelties of the early 90’s!

Well worth a read. As ever, best read in Full Screen. We welcome scans of League of Ireland fanzines, mail me at donal.ofalluin.2009@nuim.ie to get in touch.

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This city is carved up nicely in terms of the domestic game.

There’s no love-in between us all either, we might share a passion for a sport but our teams are unique and history dictates these things, doesn’t it? A Bohs/Rovers derby can match the best of them for passion, a bit of the old tribal division and atmosphere. Still, one couldn’t help but think the humour and passion of supporters of the domestic game shined through tonight on television, with Shamrock Rovers supporters greeting one of the largest teams in Italian soccer with a rendition of ‘WHO ARE YIS’, before applauding Allesandro Del Piero onto the pitch towards the end. Some players you just have to clap on the pitch, really.

He hadn’t kicked a ball before ‘You’ll never play for Rovers” was echoing around the stadium. Excellent. Pity the crowd were so loud we couldn’t hear Allesandro go “Thank Christ!”

What a shame we won’t see the League of Ireland Dublin Derby tomorrow night on telly, we’ll have to wait for Manchester United.

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As a Bohs fan, the “Quote of the day” in the Guardian gave me a laugh last Friday, the day after Rovers ahem… “historic” victory over in Tel Aviv in the Europa League Qualifiers. While I won’t begrudge them their glamour tie / day in the sun / whatever you call it tonight, I’ll watch it, and  the return leg with interest and my heart being pulled two ways- hoping to see an Irish side do well against a time of Juve’s stature, and at the same time, hoping Rovers fail miserably in everything they do.

But anyways, the quote. It wasn’t the comment from Juventus forward David Lanzafame that got me giggling but the remark after it:

“We do not know Shamrock Rovers and therefore we have to study them through videos” – Juventus forward David Lanzafame looks forward to next week’s Big Vase third round qualifier against Irish side Shamrock Rovers in Robbie Keane’s hometown of Tallaght. If Juventus lose, they won’t be the first Old Lady to have been mugged in the notoriously rough Dublin village.

A bit harsh you might say? Never… But considering what the majority of LOI fans call our Wicklow brethern, the accompanying picture spoke a thousand words…

The Guardian get it so right...

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